This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

Design News & Postings 

1006, 2016

Infographic Design

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Infographic Design

With infographic design, the foundation of any good infographic is data visualization. Always take the opportunity to display information visually. If there isn’t any data visualization, or if some pictures are missing in the whole context, then you are doing too much telling and not enough showing.

Typography can make or break a design, but it should not be the solution to a data visualization problem. More often designers begin an infographic with excitement, but they lose steam fast as they continue down the page. This often leads to poor design solutions, like using typography to show off a big number instead of visualizing it in some way. Typography does have its uses, which should not be ignored when creating an infographic. The title of the infographic is a good opportunity to use an eye-catching font and to give it a treatment that fits the theme or topic. The right title design can engage people enough to scroll through. Headings help to break up an infographic and make the data easier to take in.

Organizing an infographic in a way that makes sense and that keeps the viewer interested is not always easy. Usually, you will be given a lot of data and will need to create a visual story out of it. This can be challenging at first, but you can follow some general rules to make things easier. Organizing the data and sectioning off data without relying entirely on headings is a good way to break the monotony.

All good stories have a beginning, middle and end. Infographics deserve the same treatment. Every good infographic has a hook. This hook is the main point of the design. Placing the hook at either the center or very end of the infographic is usually the best so that it grabs more attention. Give the most important information the most visual weight, so that readers know what to take away.

1103, 2016

Brochure Design Tips That Sell

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Brochures are a great way for a company to further brand their company. Whether a company is trying to sell something, inform their target audience of their services, or simply serving an educational purpose it’s important that you understand the objectives.

You should always take some time in the initial stages to clarify some of the projects objectives. This will help in the design process.

Size

Size is an important factor. It not only gives you an exact space to work with but it will help you if you are involved in the process of obtaining an estimate from a printer. Printers often will ask for the flat size of the piece, meaning what size it is before any folds.

Color
Clarifying color decisions early on will not only help in the design process but will make a big difference in printing prices. For instance, using 2 color spot/PMS is cheaper than 4-color CMYK.

Folds
There are different types of folds for brochures. It’s important to know the way the brochure will fold prior to designing so that you can create a unified piece. You can consult with the printer on this.

Bleeds & Margins
Most brochures do have bleeds incorporated into the design.  A bleed basically extends the graphical elements past the document size/trim size so that when the piece is being trimmed there are no white lines around the document size.

Fonts
For print projects, you should use postscript or Open type fonts. Open type fonts are mac and pc compatible.

Graphic file types
The main file formats that are used for print are TIFF and EPS. Both file formats, regardless of whether the graphic is bitmap or vector, should be in CMYK color mode. Bitmap images should be saved at 300 dpi unless specified otherwise. TIFF file format should be used for photographs or bitmap images. EPS file format should be used for vector graphics.

brochure design
2802, 2016

How to Design a Powerpoint That Rocks

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In designing a PowerPoint deck, a little planning is crucial.

Create an outline.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint without rhyme or reason. The reason why you are putting up slides is to expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should at least know what you are going to say and then think of how to visualize it.

Create a script that has a good storytelling sequence: it has a beginning, middle, and end. Make your audience appreciate each slide but interested to find out what’s next; and better still, always leave them wanting more.

One topic at a time.

Just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. You must control the flow of information so that you and your audience are attuned to one another.

Skip the paragraphs.

A Powerpoint presentation is meant to reinforce your points, and it is not meant to bore your audience with long text and complicating charts. If you really need to dispense the information, print them separately and distribute them to the audience if need be, but don’t display them into the screen and read it from the screen.

Visual design is important.

Avoid dressing up your pages with cheesy effects. It is a big no-no. Focus instead on simple design basics like using uncluttered sans-serif fonts for easy reading. Use dark background sparingly. The preferred style should be black text and white background. Use coloured text only to highlight headlines or subheadlines and limit to maximum 2 colours for the whole presentation. Use center alignment of text sparingly. The preferred alignment is left. Lastly, avoid clutter like a plague. Keep to 1 or 2 photo images per page, that’s it. Don’t ever use those hideous cliparts. They don’t have any place in your professional presentation – unless you want to be funny on a certain point.

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